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Chapter 4 Zen & Creative Management

Page 23

But our definition of a product as an idea in a form is not complete.  It was only when the block-of-wood-that-could-be-a-doorstop was put into juxtaposition with doors and wind-in other words when a demand was envisaged-that the block of wood truly took on the characteristics of a product.  A product is therefore an idea in a form with a demand.

An idea reveals relations between phenomena, as opposed to a fact that could be said to express those relations.  The idea is the center of gravity of the field in which it is perceived.  The best analogy would be a center of light.  The “form” of a product corresponds to the expression of relations revealed by an idea.  Ideas alone are in demand, and old-time salesmen knew that they should “sell the sizzle and not the steak.”  Wherever one looks there are ideas that have been put into forms that have a demand: a pen, a desk, a room, or a building were originally ideas conceived by a man.  Some of these ideas subsume a great number of other ideas.  A car, for instance, subsumes thousands of ideas, including those that are expressed by the engine, the car body, the transmission, and the wheels, as well as those that are expressed in traffic laws, maps, and roads.

Some ideas can be specifically traced to their origin, others cannot.  Where was the idea of a wheel first perceived?  Who perceived a tie as being suitable apparel?  The building you are in would have been conceived by an architect; the automobile was first designed by an engineer.  Bell first perceived the telephone and Edison the electric light bulb.  Whether or not the author is known, the idea originated with man.

It is through form that an idea becomes “something.”  Man fixes his idea in matter through energy, space, and time, or in the expectations of others, and so “expresses” his idea.  This expression imposes limits upon the idea, isolates it, separates it from all others, and so makes it “a thing.”  

March 21st, 2020 ~ Idea vs.  fact.  This is discussed in Krishnamurti’s work, including this video: What is Guilt?”.  I blog about it here.  The author describes the difference between the two: revealing relations between phenomena as opposed to an expression of those relations.  Is the author saying putting an idea into form is related to fact?  He says that salespeople “sold the sizzle and not the steak”.  Sell the the multitude of ideas around a “form” and not the form itself.  Unfortunately, salespeople “hook” us into buying as opposed to “attracting” us. 

Can we really ever know the origin of something such as an idea?  

What I love is the structure of this Idea >>>Form>>>Demand===Product!

Finally, the author says: “Man fixes his idea in matter through energy, space and time, or in the expectations of others, and so “expresses” his idea.  This expression imposes limits upon the idea, isolates it, separates it from all others, and so makes it ” a thing.”

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